G is for Green

For my 7th post for the  Blogging A to Z Challenge, I decided to do another photo essay. This time, focusing on the colour green. And what are the best things that come in green? Why plants, of course. 🙂

G is for GREEN

Green, green plants

Today’s photo essay is about the trees and shrubs planted in agriculture. They are planted frequently in large scale plantations.

The first photo of the day highlights the iconic tea plantations of Cameron Highlands. When William Cameron, a British colonial government surveyor, and his companion Kulop Riau, went on a mapping expedition of the Titiwangsa range in 1885, Cameron reported that he saw a plateau, of an elevation of 4,400 to 4,500ft. However, he did not mark his find on the map. This plateau was confirmed in subsequent reports of the area. Nonetheless, the area was eventually named in his honour. Cameron Highlands was not really marked for development until Sir George Maxwell proposed that it be made a hill resort in 1925. In 1929, the son of a British administrative officer named John Archibald Russell founded a tea plantation, the very first in the highland resort. It is now known as the famous Boh Tea Plantation. Tea was a prized commodity during the colonial era, and the fame of Cameron Highlands grew during this period.

Tea plantation in Cameron Highlands. Photo taken on 4 June 2011.

Tea plantation in Cameron Highlands. Photo taken on 4 June 2011.

The second photo of the day features Gaharu Tea Valley Gopeng, Perak. The plantation is populated by gaharu trees, which are listed as endangered species by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES). However, the owners claim that the 200,000 trees are from a special 12-in-1 super hybrid Aquilaria spp. Also known as Agarwood and Eaglewood, gaharu has medicinal properties that are prized in the Middle Eastern, Chinese and Ayurvedic cultures.

Gaharu plantation in Gopeng, Perak. Photo taken on 3 June 2012.

Gaharu plantation in Gopeng, Perak. Photo taken on 3 June 2012.

The third photo in this photo essay features the versatile banana. High in potassium and pectin, bananas are thought to be among the most widely consumed fruits on the planet. The fruits also contain magnesium and vitamins C and B6, as well as antioxidants. The banana is native to tropical Southeast Asia. Malaysian banana varieties are the Berangan, Mas, Cavendish, Rastali, Tanduk, Raja, Nipah, Nangka and Lawak. Click here to find out more about the banana varieties in Malaysia.

Banana plantation belonging to aborigines in Pos Buntu, Raub, Pahang. Photo taken on 27 June 2014.

Banana plantation belonging to aborigines in Pos Buntu, Raub, Pahang. Photo taken on 27 June 2014.

The last photo features the rubber tree. It is of major economic importance, and has contributed significantly to the development of Malaysia. The milky latex extracted from the tree is the primary source of prized natural rubber.

Rubber trees belonging to aborigines in Pos Buntu, Raub, Pahang. Photo taken on 27 June 2014.

Rubber trees belonging to aborigines in Pos Buntu, Raub, Pahang. Photo taken on 27 June 2014.

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About khorhmin

Just a curious girl, Feeling my way, Through life in a twirl, Enjoying each and every day. Moving fast, in a swirl Each and every day Publishing is my world Writing, editing, yay!
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