P is for Paddy Fields

For my 16th post for the  Blogging A to Z Challenge, I compiled photos I took at the famous Sekinchan paddy fields on 30 August 2014 into a photo essay.

P is for Paddy Fields

Paddy Fields in Sekinchan

Sekinchan is nicknamed the ‘rice bowl of Selangor’. The name Sekinchan literally means ‘village suitable for plantation’ in Chinese. Large plots of flat land are cultivated exclusively for rice planting year round and the farming methods are modern and mechanised. The area is well known for its high yield. There is a fixed time table for farming all year round, and you can see it here.

Seedlings freshly planted. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Seedlings freshly planted.

The months of March and September are seedling transplanting periods, when the seedlings are transplanted from their little trays into the paddy fields, so the rice fields will be all green. On the other hand, June and December are the harvesting periods, so the fields will be a golden yellow hue. As you can imagine, the place is a magnet for photography enthusiasts looking forward to taking nice scenery shots of paddy fields.

Seedlings freshly planted. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Seedlings freshly planted.

When I went on 30 August, the seedlings has already been planted. So, the farmers were ahead of schedule. 🙂 Visitors can visit the processing plants too, such as PLS Marketing (M) Sdn. Bhd. During the visit, one can purchase rice and other local produce.

Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Scenic paddy fields of Sekinchan

Red flowers blooming beside the irrigation canal at Sekinchan paddy fields. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Red flowers blooming beside the aqueduct (irrigation canal) at Sekinchan paddy fields.

Busy worker in the fields at midday. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Busy farmer in the fields at midday, working in the scorching heat.

The modern mechanised farming methods used in the Sekinchan fields ensure the systematic running of operations and a consistently high yield.

Rice seedling transplanters. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Rice seedling transplanters.

Seedlings growing in the fields with a backdrop of a swiftlet house. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Seedlings growing in the fields with a backdrop of a swiftlet house.

There are roads connecting to a small village in the middle of the paddy fields, so visitors can actually drive beside the fields. There are also aqueducts (irrigation canals) beside the roads and cutting across the fields.

Traditional Malay kampong complete with coconut palms right in the middle of the paddy fields. Photo taken on 30 August 2014.

Traditional Malay kampung complete with coconut palms right in the middle of the paddy fields.

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About khorhmin

Just a curious girl, Feeling my way, Through life in a twirl, Enjoying each and every day. Moving fast, in a swirl Each and every day Publishing is my world Writing, editing, yay!
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4 Responses to P is for Paddy Fields

  1. Wow, just wow…I had no idea the fields were so enormous. Is there any problems with continuously growing in one spot year after year, aka monoculture? The photo of the farm worker in the field gives some real perspective.

  2. khorhmin says:

    I think they are taking measures to ensure that the soil and land are taken care of. Although I personally am not an expert on rice planting. Rice is a staple food in Asia and farmers have been planting rice for thousands of years.

  3. These are beautiful pictures. I visited a historical plantation near Charleston, SC where the guide described how a teenage slave would care for a small rice field. She would need her brother to stand watch while she tended the field to warn her of alligators!

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