Sunset

I have always liked the sun. Of course, there are times I wished it did not shine so very brightly at the most inappropriate moments, like when I am hiking up a hill on an exposed trail and forgot to bring my sunblock (as usual). However, without the sun, we would be cold and walking around in darkness, and the plants would not be able to grow, so we would starve. So, with all this in mind, I wrote a poem about the beauty of the setting sun today. 🙂

Photo taken at Northam Beach Cafe on 9 May 2014.
Photo taken at Northam Beach Cafe, Penang Island, on 9 May 2014.

Poetic style

This poem was written in the style of an Ottava Rima. It is an Italian poem made up of eight lines that rhyme. Each line consists of eleven syllables.

An Ottava Rima poem is made up of an octave with the following rhyming pattern:

 ab
 ab
 ab
 cc

The rhyming pattern for my poem is shown below:

Sunset

(a) As surely as the sun shines high in the sky
(b) Illuminating the world with its warm glow
(a) The earth spins tirelessly as it bids goodbye
(b) The fiery orb hangs low as the waters flow
(a) For a moment it seems as if it would fly
(b) Escape the extinguishing waves that swallow
(c) Only to relent and sink into the night
(c) Bidding us adieu, as the moon blazes bright

Here are some more sunset photos I took a while ago. I hope you like them as much as I enjoyed taking them. 🙂

Sunset at Morib Beach. Photo taken on 31 August 2012.
Sunset at Morib Beach. Photo taken on 31 August 2012.
Sunset at Morib Beach. Photo taken on 31 August 2012.
Sunset at Morib Beach. Photo taken on 31 August 2012.
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Sunlight

The giver of life
Provider, nourishing plants
Lighting up the world
Always present, everywhere
Adore your warm golden glow

 

An original tanka by
Khor Hui Min
20 July 2014

 

Poetic style
This poem was written in the style of a tanka. A tanka is a Japanese poem (also known as a waka or uta). A tanka poem is similar to a haiku poem, but has two additional lines.

A tanka has 5 lines and 31 syllables. The structure is as follows:

Line 1 – 5 syllables
Line 2 – 7 syllables
Line 3 – 5 syllables
Line 4 – 7 syllables
Line 5 – 7 syllables

 

I’ve shown my poem with the number of syllables per line as below:
(5)  The giver of life
(7)  Provider, nourishing plants
(5)  Lighting up the world
(7)  Always present, everywhere
(7)  Adore your warm golden glow

To find out more about tanka poems, visit the Young Writers’ Website.